Concordia University


College of Education

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Accreditation

ED530 Human Diversity for In-Service Teachers

Departments
 Teacher Education

 Kinesiology and
     Health Sciences


Lutheran Classroom Teacher
 
Child and Family Education

Conceptual Framework


 


Contact College of Education
Don Helmstetter, Dean

Elizabeth Coleman, Program Support Specialist
Office: AD 318
Office Phone: (651) 641-8200
Office. Fax: (651) 603-6240
E-mail: Coleman@csp.edu

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275 Syndicate Street North
St. Paul, MN 55104-5494
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CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Appendix 

Conceptual Framework for College of Education Programs (Print)


EDUCATOR AS PROFESSIONAL DECISION MAKER,

REFLECTIVE PRACTITIONER, AND ADAPTIVE EXPERT 

Full Text Document

Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework of the education programs - Educator as Professional Decision Maker, Reflective Practitioner, and Adaptive Expert - articulates the multiple dimensions of these programs at Concordia University. The included visual model (Figure 1) presents the components of the framework and communicates the relationships that the components have with one another. The model suggests a dynamic, interactive, energetic, and productive orientation to the preparation of professional educators at Concordia University.

Educator as Professional Decision Maker Outcomes
Initial Licensure/Undergraduate

Educational outcomes provide a description of the cognitive and non-cognitive (affective) qualities the Concordia University program helps candidates acquire and more fully develop. The Educator as Professional Decision Maker outcomes provide a complete listing and articulation of the goals of the initial/undergraduate level. It describes the personal and professional arenas of decision-making within which the Concordia University graduate is prepared to function successfully.

Upon completion of the initial/undergraduate teacher education licensure programs at Concordia University, candidates will be professional, academically capable, and personally responsible entry-level educators who are able to apply knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to subject matter, learning and human development, and teaching strategies to the classroom environment. Candidates will also be able to demonstrate personal qualities that foster learning in others by demonstrating positive and caring dispositions, providing direction, and making instructional decisions that enhance educational opportunities for all students.

  1. Subject matter
    1. Demonstrates the intellectual breadth of a liberally-educated person.
    2. Conveys the central concepts, tools of inquiry, content, and structures of the academic discipline(s).
      INTASC #1a: Subject Matter - The candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) s/he teaches.
  2. Learning and human development
    1. Applies developmental theories and a philosophy of education in designing instruction.
      INTASC #2a: Student Learning - The candidate understands how children and youth learn and develop.
    2. Demonstrates knowledge of and sensitivity to diverse ways of learning including learning styles related to culture, gender, and ability.
      INTASC #3a: Diverse Learners - The candidate understands how learners differ in their approaches to learning.
  3. Teaching strategies
    1. Communicates clearly verbally and in writing.
      INTASC #6: Communication - The candidate uses knowledge of effective verbal, non-verbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
    2. Engages students through a variety of instructional strategies (including instructional technology).
      INTASC #1b: Subject Matter - Based upon knowledge of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) s/he teaches, the candidate can create learning experiences that make subject matter meaningful for students.

      INTASC #2b: Student Learning - Based upon an understanding of how children learn and develop, the candidate can provide learning opportunities that support students' intellectual, social and personal development.

      INTASC #3b: Diverse Learners - Based upon an understanding of how learners differ in their approaches to learning, the candidate creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to learners from diverse cultural backgrounds and with exceptionalities.

      INTASC #4: Instructional Strategies -The candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage the students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

      INTASC #5: Learning Environment - The candidate uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

      INTASC #7: Planning Instruction - The candidate plans and manages instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
    3. Applies classroom management strategies successfully according to individual student needs.
    4. Involves students in curricular, management, and instructional decisions when appropriate.
    5. Assesses, evaluates, and communicates student learning effectively.
      INTASC #8: Assessment - The candidate understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of his/her learners.

      INTASC #10: Collaboration, Ethics, and Relationships - The candidate communicates and interacts with parents/guardians, families, school colleagues, and the community to support the students' learning and well being.
  4. Personal qualities that foster learning
    1. Maintains a positive self-image, respect and concern for students and co-workers, enthusiasm and resourcefulness, and physical and emotional well-being.
    2. Demonstrates awareness of professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities and rights of teachers, knowledge of school organizational structure, and the relationship with the social and philosophical foundations of education.
    3. Initiates responsibility for continuous self learning.
      INTASC #9: Reflection and Professional Development - The candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
      Regarding teaching in Lutheran schools (applies to Lutheran classroom teacher candidates):
      1. Models a Christian life based upon a hope in Jesus Christ as Savior.
      2. Demonstrates knowledge and skill needed to serve in the parish and school.
      3. Demonstrates sufficient theological insight to communicate the Gospel effectively.

Educator as Reflective Practitioner and Adaptive Expert
Advanced/Graduate

The advanced/graduate teacher education programs are focused on the preparation of educators who are not only professional decision makers (initial/undergraduate) but also reflective practitioners and adaptive experts (advanced/graduate).

Reflective Practitioner

The foundation for the conception of educators as reflective practitioners has, at its core, the work of Dewey (1933/1998); Smith & Geoffrey (1968); Cruikshank (1987); Schön (1987); Valli (1992); Zeichner & Liston (1996); Brookfield (1998); Bransford, Brown, and Cocking (1999); Darling-Hammond, Bransford, LePage, Hammerness, & Duffy (2005); and Darling-Hammond (2006), among others. The writings of these educators/ researchers provide the basis for the conception of reflective practitioners at the advanced/graduate level.

Dewey (1933) introduced the notion of reflection and reflective thinking for teachers in the 1920's as part of his university laboratory school. He viewed education as an unfolding process in which the teacher facilitates the child's learning or understanding of the world around them (1938). Dewey's thoughts, in many ways, are extensions of the work of Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbert, and Parker - a more naturalist view - in which the child's experience is seen as the heart of learning. The learner is viewed as an emerging and inquiring being, actively striving to understand and manage his/her surroundings. This places both the curriculum and teaching methods in a new light. The quality of the learning experience grows in importance. Students are involved in understanding and constructing their reality and not just memorizing. This more pragmatic approach to learning and teaching contributes a strong base to the understanding of teaching in the graduate programs at Concordia University.

Schön (1987) describes an epistemology of practice that makes the distinction between school knowledge and what he describes as the kind of artistry that good teachers in their everyday work often display, reflection-in-action. Brookfield (1998) describes critically reflective practice as a process of inquiry that involves the practitioner in trying to discover the assumptions that frame how they work. The Concordia University advanced/graduate programs ask learners to consistently reflect on their current practice in education and compare them to research-based, best practices as suggested by professional organizations and pertinent research (e.g., National Association for the Education of Young Children).

Adaptive Expert

The foundation for the conception of educators as adaptive experts reflects the work of the following: Hatano & Inagaki (1986); Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (1999); Hatano & Osura (2003); Darling-Hammond, Bransford, LePage, Hammerness, & Duffy (2005); Darling-Hammond (2006); and Lin, Schwartz, & Bransford (2007), among others. The writings of these educators/researchers provide the basis for developing adaptive expertise at the advanced/graduate level.

The development of adaptive expertise is the "gold standard for becoming a professional" according to Darling-Hammond, et al., (2005). They hypothesize that there are two dimensions of expertise: efficiency and innovation.

Expertise along the efficiency dimension involves greater abilities to perform particular tasks without having to devote too many additional resources to achieve them….Expert teachers are able to perform a variety of activities without having to stop and think about how to do them. Examples include how to manage a classroom while students are working in groups, how to give directions and hand out materials while keeping everyone's attention, how to predict the range of answers that students may give to a particular question about a concept in math, history, science, and so forth. Expert teachers are also able to notice patterns of classroom activity that, to the novice, often seem like disorganized chaos….

Lifelong learning along the innovation dimension typically involves moving beyond existing routines and often requires people to rethink key ideas, practices, and even values in order to change what they are doing. These kinds of activities can be highly emotionally charged, and the capacity to consider change without feeling threatened is an important ability (p. 361).

NOTE: Please see the Concordia University College of Education internet website for a complete rendition of this conceptual framework including complete citations for each of the references noted above.

Outcomes for COE MA programs
MA in Educational Leadership

The Master of Arts in Education program with an emphasis in Educational Leadership prepares highly effective professional, decision-making, and reflective leaders for educational settings who:

  1. Exhibit strong communication (written, oral, listening) and critical thinking skills.
  2. Provide high-level instructional leadership including supervision of educational curriculum and instruction.
  3. Evaluate educational research for professional decision-making, leading to school improvement and better student learning.
  4. Design and implement educational solutions to issues stemming from the reality of multi-cultural, multi-linguistic, and multi-ability school populations.
  5. Demonstrate effective leadership, administration, and management skills for professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities and rights of teachers, knowledge of school organizational structure, and the relationship with the social and philosophical foundations of education.
  6. Administer effectively curricular, financial, and personnel resources for educational purposes.
  7. Participate actively in educational politics, policy analysis, and policy implementation.

"Grand Tour Question": In light of what we know about how children learn and educational policy and practice, how shall we best lead in educational settings today in order to impact student learning?

MA in Classroom Instruction

The Master of Arts in Education program with an emphasis in Classroom Instruction prepares highly effective professional, decision-making, and reflective educators who:

  1. Exhibit strong communication (written, oral, listening) and critical thinking skills.
  2. Provide high-level instructional leadership including supervision of educational curriculum and instruction congruent with historical and contemporary ideas in education.
  3. Design classroom instruction that utilizes best practices in educational technology
  4. Evaluate educational research for professional decision-making leading to improvement in student learning.
  5. Design and implement educational solutions to issues stemming from the reality of multi-cultural, multi-linguistic, and multi-ability school populations.
  6. Demonstrate awareness of professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities and rights of teachers, knowledge of school organizational structure, and the relationship with the social and philosophical foundations of education.

"Grand Tour Question": In light of what we know about how children learn and educational policy and practice, how shall we best teach to impact student learning?

MA in Classroom Instruction with K-12 Reading emphasis

The Master of Arts in Education program with an emphasis in Classroom Instruction (with Reading emphasis) prepares highly effective professional, decision-making, and reflective educators who:

  1. Exhibit strong communication (written, oral, listening) and critical thinking skills.
  2. Evaluate educational research for professional decision-making leading to improvement in student learning.
  3. Design and implement educational solutions to issues stemming from the reality of multi-cultural, multi-linguistic, and multi-ability school populations.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of literacy, i.e. reading and writing processes and instruction.
  5. Effectively use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction.
  6. Effectively use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction.
  7. Create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.
  8. Demonstrate awareness of professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities and rights of teachers, knowledge of school organizational structure, and the relationship with the social and philosophical foundations of education.

"Grand Tour Question": In light of what we know about how children learn and educational policy and practice, how shall we best teach literacy in educational settings today?

MA in Early Childhood Education

The Master of Arts in Education program with an emphasis in Early Childhood Education prepares highly effective professional, decision-making, and reflective educators who:

  1. Understand the theoretical perspectives supporting the broad content of the discipline.
  2. Connect theory with the essential relationships between research and practice within the discipline.
  3. Communicate the content of the discipline effectively through academic and professional activities.
  4. Design and implement research and apply the results to a practical problem.
  5. Access and utilize research to inform decision making in programs for children and families.

MA in Differentiated Instruction

The Master of Arts in Education program with an emphasis in Differentiated Instruction prepares highly effective professional, decision-making, and reflective educators who:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical bases of researched-based strategies in relation to diverse curricular and behavioral situations.
  2. Demonstrate an increased ability to analyze curricular situations and adapt instructional strategies accordingly.
  3. Demonstrate application of new strategic knowledge and understanding of differentiated instruction to their own practice in educational settings, designing explicit curriculum documents that represent actual educational practices.
  4. Demonstrate investigation and identification of the personal curricular beliefs and theories that guide their own professional function.
  5. Demonstrate collaboration skills as members of teams within inclusive settings, taking leadership roles in schools and programs.
  6. Demonstrate ability to conduct research, to evaluate and apply the research of others, and to present, orally and in writing, the results of such study and research.
  7. Demonstrate completion of a program of advanced study and a commitment to continuous self-directed professional growth.

Please contact Elizabeth Coleman about content on this page last updated on May 04 2009.

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